Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Occupational Exposure to Silica

@article{Rushton2007ChronicOP,
  title={Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Occupational Exposure to Silica},
  author={Lesley Rushton},
  journal={Reviews on Environmental Health},
  year={2007},
  volume={22},
  pages={255 - 272}
}
  • L. Rushton
  • Published 1 October 2007
  • Medicine
  • Reviews on Environmental Health
Prolonged exposure to high levels of silica has long been known to cause silicosis This paper evaluates the evidence for an increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in occupations and industries in which exposure to crystalline silica is the primary exposure, with a focus on the magnitude of risks and levels of exposure causing disabling health effects. The literature suggests consistently elevated risks of developing COPD associated with silica exposure in several… Expand
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  • Medicine
  • Reviews on environmental health
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