Chromosomal dynamics of human neocentromere formation

@article{Warburton2004ChromosomalDO,
  title={Chromosomal dynamics of human neocentromere formation},
  author={Peter E. Warburton},
  journal={Chromosome Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={12},
  pages={617-626}
}
  • P. Warburton
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Chromosome Research
Neocentromeres are rare human chromosomal aberrations where a new centromere has formed in a previously non-centromeric location. The emergence of new centromeres on a chromosome that already contains an endogenous centromere would be a highly deleterious event which would lead to dicentricity and mitotic instability. Nonetheless, neocentromere formation appears to provide a mechanism for the acquisition of a new centromere. Neocentromeres are most often observed on chromosomal arm fragments… 
Evolutionary new centromeres in primates.
The centromere has a pivotal role in structuring chromosomal architecture, but remains a poorly understood and seemingly paradoxical "black hole." Centromeres are a very rapidly evolving segment of
Neocentromeres Form Efficiently at Multiple Possible Loci in Candida albicans
TLDR
The ability to select for neocentromere formation and movement in C. albicans permits mechanistic analysis of the assembly and maintenance of a regional centromere.
First Case of a Neocentromere Formation in an Otherwise Normal Chromosome 7
TLDR
Overall, a new case of centromere repositioning at a position not known to harbor an ancestral inactivatedCentromere in a clinically normal female is reported.
Retention of latent centromeres in the Mammalian genome.
TLDR
The theories proposed to explain centromere repositioning in mammals are examined in light of evidence gained in human studies and in the presented data from the marsupial model species Macropus eugenii, the tammar wallaby.
A paucity of heterochromatin at functional human neocentromeres
TLDR
This high-resolution mapping suggests that H3K4me2 does not seem sufficiently abundant to play a structural role at neocentromres, as proposed for endogenous centromeres, and large domains of heterochromatin also do not appear necessary for centromere function.
Engineered human dicentric chromosomes show centromere plasticity
TLDR
E engineered dicentric human chromosomes are used to investigate mammalian centromere structure and function and provide evidence that the activity of human centromeres, while largely stable, can be subject to dynamic change.
Centromere identity: a challenge to be faced
TLDR
This review will review the recent studies on the factors responsible for generating unique centromeric chromatin and how it perpetuates during cell division giving the present-day models and focus on the probable mechanism of de novo centromere formation.
Human centromere repositioning within euchromatin after partial chromosome deletion
TLDR
This work highlights that chromosome rearrangements, particularly those that remove the pericentromere, create opportunities for centromeric nucleosomes to move into non-traditional genomic locations, potentially changing the surrounding chromatin environment and altering gene expression.
Structural and functional analysis of centromeric chromatin
TLDR
Animal neocentromeres are used as simplified models to investigate the molecular mechanisms that underlay the formation and the maintenance of functional centromeres and structural polymorphism of the chromosome 11 centromeric domain of Caballus population is described.
The evolutionary life cycle of the resilient centromere
TLDR
It is shown that the centromere locus is a resilient structure that can undergo evolutionary cycles of birth, growth, maturity, death and resurrection and Surprisingly, ancestral centromeres can undergo resurrection either in the field or in the laboratory, via as yet poorly understood mechanisms.
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