Chromalveolates and the Evolution of Plastids by Secondary Endosymbiosis 1

@article{Keeling2009ChromalveolatesAT,
  title={Chromalveolates and the Evolution of Plastids by Secondary Endosymbiosis 1},
  author={P. Keeling},
  journal={Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={56}
}
  • P. Keeling
  • Published 2009
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology
ABSTRACT. The establishment of a new plastid organelle by secondary endosymbiosis represents a series of events of massive complexity, and yet we know it has taken place multiple times because both green and red algae have been taken up by other eukaryotic lineages. Exactly how many times these events have succeeded, however, has been a matter of debate that significantly impacts how we view plastid evolution, protein targeting, and eukaryotic relationships. On the green side it is now largely… Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
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