Chromalveolates and the Evolution of Plastids by Secondary Endosymbiosis 1

@article{Keeling2009ChromalveolatesAT,
  title={Chromalveolates and the Evolution of Plastids by Secondary Endosymbiosis 1},
  author={Patrick J. Keeling},
  journal={Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={56}
}
  • P. Keeling
  • Published 2009
  • Biology
  • Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology
ABSTRACT. The establishment of a new plastid organelle by secondary endosymbiosis represents a series of events of massive complexity, and yet we know it has taken place multiple times because both green and red algae have been taken up by other eukaryotic lineages. Exactly how many times these events have succeeded, however, has been a matter of debate that significantly impacts how we view plastid evolution, protein targeting, and eukaryotic relationships. On the green side it is now largely… 
The endosymbiotic origin, diversification and fate of plastids
  • P. Keeling
  • Biology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2010
TLDR
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TLDR
Details of the structures, evolutionary origins, and processes involved in these varied endosymbioses, including feeding mechanisms, endosYmbiotic gene transfer, and how nucleus-encoded proteins are targeted to each of these photosynthetic entities are discussed.
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TLDR
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TLDR
The plastid—that is, chloroplast—the organelle of photosynthesis in eukaryotic cells is debated, which accounts for the so‐called primary plastids in green algae and their land plant relatives, in red algae and in glaucophytes, which together comprise Plantae (or Archaeplastida)—one of five or six recognized eukARYotic supergroups.
Phylogenomic evidence for separate acquisition of plastids in cryptophytes, haptophytes, and stramenopiles.
TLDR
A phylogenomic falsification of the chromalveolate hypothesis that estimates signal strength across the three genomic compartments is devised, and the hypothesis is rejected as falsified in favor of more complex evolutionary scenarios involving multiple higher order eukaryotes-eukaryote endosymbioses.
Plastid genomes of two brown algae, Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus: further insights on the evolution of red-algal derived plastids
TLDR
The phylogenetic relationship between heterokonts, cryptophytes and haptophytes (collectively referred to as chromists) plastids was investigated using several datasets of concatenated proteins from two cyanobacterial genomes and 18 plastid genomes, including most of the available red algal and chromist plastID genomes.
Contributions of Oxyrrhis marina to molecular biology, genomics and organelle evolution of dinoflagellates
The flagellate Oxyrrhis marina has been the subject of numerous studies addressing diverse aspects of protist biology including feeding, motility, ecology and cell biology. In spite of the rich body
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