Choristoderes and the freshwater assemblages of Laurasia

@article{Matsumoto2010ChoristoderesAT,
  title={Choristoderes and the freshwater assemblages of Laurasia},
  author={Ryoko Matsumoto and Susan E. Evans},
  journal={Journal of Iberian Geology},
  year={2010},
  volume={36},
  pages={253-274}
}
  • R. Matsumoto, S. Evans
  • Published 10 December 2010
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Journal of Iberian Geology
Choristoderes are freshwater aquatic diapsid reptiles of uncertain phylogenetic position. Although the lineage probably diverged from other diapsids in the Permo Triassic, choristoderes apparently never reached Gondwana. Within Laurasia, however, they have been recovered from Japan, China, Mongolia, Trans-Baikal Russia, Central Asia, Western Europe, and North America, reaching extreme northern latitudes. Setting aside controversial Triassic records, their known temporal range currently extends… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

New Material of the Choristodere Lazarussuchus (Diapsida, Choristodera) from the Paleocene of France
ABSTRACT Choristodera is a clade of freshwater aquatic reptiles with a strictly Laurasian distribution and a temporal record extending from at least Middle Jurassic to Miocene. The large
A new choristodere (Reptilia: Choristodera) from an Aptian–Albian coal deposit in China
Choristoderes are a small clade of freshwater aquatic reptiles known from deposits of Jurassic–Miocene age. They show their greatest diversity in the Early Cretaceous of Asia, with seven recorded
The first record of a nearly complete choristodere (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Upper Jurassic of Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China
Choristodera are freshwater aquatic reptiles known from the Middle Jurassic to the Miocene. Their fossil record shows a peak in diversity in the Early Cretaceous of eastern Asia, most notably in the
Revealing body proportions of the enigmatic choristodere reptile Khurendukhosaurus from Mongolia
Khurendukhosaurus is an enigmatic genus of choristodere, recorded from the Lower Cretaceous of East Asia, Mongolia, and Siberian Russia. Until now, it was known only from isolated skull and
An Appalachian population of neochoristoderes (Diapsida, Choristodera) elucidated using fossil evidence and ecological niche modelling
Four neochoristoderan vertebral centra are described from the latest Cretaceous of New Jersey, USA. One specimen was recovered from the basal transgressive lag of the Navesink Formation in the area
High morphological disparity in a bizarre Paleocene fauna of predatory freshwater reptiles
  • C. Brownstein
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    BMC ecology and evolution
  • 2022
TLDR
The skulls and skeletons of two new choristoderes from a single Paleocene ecosystem in western North America are described that reveal the hidden Cenozoic diversity of this reptile clade and strengthen the evidence for the existence of distinctive freshwater faunas in Paleogene Eurasia and North America.
Late Triassic Marine Reptiles
During faunal recovery after the Permo-Triassic mass extinction (PTME), several tetrapod lineages independently evolved adaptations to marine life. Thus reptiles became significant elements of marine
Review of taxonomy, geographic distribution, and paleoenvironments of Azhdarchidae (Pterosauria)
TLDR
The four proposed autapomorphies of Eurazhdarcho langendorfensis from the lower Maastrichtian Sebeş Formation of Romania are based on misinterpretations of material and this taxon is likely a subjective junior synonym of Hatzegopteryx thambema.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 139 REFERENCES
EXCEPTIONAL FOSSIL MATERIAL OF A SEMI-AQUATIC REPTILE FROM CHINA: THE RESOLUTION OF AN ENIGMA
TLDR
The newly recovered Monjurosuchus specimens from western Liaoning show unique integumentary structures of this aquatic reptile for the first time, providing important new information on the soft anatomy and lifestyle of choristoderes.
The earliest possible choristodere (Diapsida) and gaps in the fossil record of semi-aquatic Reptiles
  • G. Storrs, D. Gower
  • Environmental Science, Geography
    Journal of the Geological Society
  • 1993
TLDR
Failure of the record to reveal the evolutionary histories of those reptilian taxa that are most prone to fossilization emphasizes the need for rigorous, character-based studies in phylogenetic analysis of tetrapod lineages, rather than reliance upon stratigraphical position as an indicator of phylogenetic branching sequence.
LATE PLIOCENE ALBANERPETONTIDAE (LISSAMPHIBIA) FROM ITALY
Dipartimento di Biologia ed Evoluzione, Universita di Ferrara, Corso Ercole I° d’Este 32,I-44100 Ferrara, Italy, benedetto.sala@unife.itAfter several decades of stability, a recent paper by
The choristoderan reptile Monjurosuchus from the early Cretaceous of Japan
TLDR
A cladistic analysis was performed in order to place Japanese and Chinese taxa, including the incompletely described Chinese long-necked Hyphalosaurus lingyanensis, into choristoderan phylogeny, and the results support the monophyly of Neochoristodera and a Sino-Japanese clade of long necked Choristoderes.
NEW CHORISTODERES (REPTILIA : DIAPSIDA) FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS AND PALAEOCENE, ALBERTA AND SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA, AND PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS OF CHORISTODERA
TLDR
Well-preserved skulls and mandibles from the Oldman and Horseshoe Canyon formations, Alberta, document a new species of Champsosaurus and clarify the status of previously known species of the genus.
THE GEOLOGICALLY YOUNGEST ALBANERPETONTID AMPHIBIAN, FROM THE LOWER PLIOCENE OF HUNGARY
Abstract:  The Albanerpetontidae are salamander‐like, Middle Jurassic to Neogene lissamphibians from Laurasia and North Africa. Extensive series of albanerpetontid bones recently identified in
Osteology and taxonomic revision of Hyphalosaurus (Diapsida: Choristodera) from the Lower Cretaceous of Liaoning, China
TLDR
Observations from a variety of growth stages reveal that significant ontogenetic change in the proportions of the body and limb bones occurred in both species of Hyphalosaurus.
A new choristodere (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Lower Cretaceous of western Liaoning Province, China, and phylogenetic relationships of Monjurosuchidae
TLDR
A new monjurosuchid is named and described based on a nearly complete skull and postcranial skeleton from the Early Cretaceous Chiufotang Formation exposed near Chaoyang, western Liaoning Province, China, and a new classification scheme is proposed for choristoderes on the basis of the recovered phylogenetic framework of the group.
A BARREMIAN NEOCHORISTODERE FROM THE CEDAR MOUNTAIN FORMATION, UTAH, U.S.A.
The Choristodera is a poorly understood group of semi-aquatic reptiles comprising about a dozen genera (Table 1 and Ksepka et al., 2005). These include the small, semi-aquatic, lizard-like
The early Triassic rhynchosaur Mesosuchus browni and the interrelationships of basal archosauromorph reptiles
  • D. Dilkes
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • 1998
TLDR
Extensions of the temporal ranges of several lineages of diapsids into the Late Permian suggests that more groups of terrestrial reptiles survived the end-Permian mass extinction than thought previously.
...
...