Chocolate Consumption is Associated with a Lower Risk of Cognitive Decline.

@article{Moreira2016ChocolateCI,
  title={Chocolate Consumption is Associated with a Lower Risk of Cognitive Decline.},
  author={Afonso Moreira and Maria Jos{\'e} Di{\'o}genes and Alexandre de Mendonça and Nuno Lunet and Henrique Barros},
  journal={Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD},
  year={2016},
  volume={53 1},
  pages={
          85-93
        }
}
Cocoa-related products like chocolate have taken an important place in our food habits and culture. In this work, we aim to examine the relationship between chocolate consumption and cognitive decline in an elderly cognitively healthy population. In the present longitudinal prospective study, a cohort of 531 participants aged 65 and over with normal Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; median 28) was selected. The median follow-up was 48 months. Dietary habits were evaluated at baseline. The… Expand
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