Chlorination and safe storage of household drinking water in developing countries to reduce waterborne disease.

@article{Sobsey2003ChlorinationAS,
  title={Chlorination and safe storage of household drinking water in developing countries to reduce waterborne disease.},
  author={Mark D. Sobsey and Thomas R. Handzel and Linda V. Venczel},
  journal={Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research},
  year={2003},
  volume={47 3},
  pages={
          221-8
        }
}
  • M. Sobsey, T. Handzel, L. Venczel
  • Published 1 February 2003
  • Business, Medicine
  • Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research
Simple, effective and affordable methods are needed to treat and safely store non-piped, gathered household water. This study evaluated point-of-use chlorination and storage in special plastic containers of gathered household water for improving microbial quality and reducing diarrhoeal illness of consumers living under conditions of poor sanitation and hygiene. Community families were recruited and randomly divided into intervention (household water chlorination and storage in a special… Expand
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