Chlamydiae as symbionts in eukaryotes.

@article{Horn2008ChlamydiaeAS,
  title={Chlamydiae as symbionts in eukaryotes.},
  author={M. Horn},
  journal={Annual review of microbiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={62},
  pages={
          113-31
        }
}
  • M. Horn
  • Published 2008
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of microbiology
Members of the phylum Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that were discovered about a century ago. Although Chlamydiae are major pathogens of humans and animals, they were long recognized only as a phylogenetically well-separated, small group of closely related microorganisms. The diversity of chlamydiae, their host range, and their occurrence in the environment had been largely underestimated. Today, several chlamydia-like bacteria have been described as symbionts of free-living… Expand

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