Chiral specificity in responses by the bark beetleDendroctonus valens to host kairomones

@article{Hobson2004ChiralSI,
  title={Chiral specificity in responses by the bark beetleDendroctonus valens to host kairomones},
  author={Kenneth R. Hobson and David L. Wood and Laurence G. Cool and Peter R. White and Toshikazu Ohtsuka and Isao Kubo and Eugene Zavarin},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={19},
  pages={1837-1846}
}
The attraction of the red turpentine beetle,Dendroctonus valens, to the resin volatiles of its host,Pinus ponderosa, is elicited by three chiral monoterpenes. In field assays response was greatest to (S)-(−)-β-pinene; 92% (S)-(−)-α-pinene found inP ponderosa resin was not attractive. However, 75% (R)-(+)-α-pinene, which occurs inPinus lambertiana, a sympatric host ofD. valens, was attractive. (S)-(−)-α-Pinene interrupted response to (R)-(+)-α-pinene. (S)-(+)-3-Carene from both hosts was… Expand
Stereospecific antennal response by red turpentine beetle,Dendroctonus valens to chiral monoterpenes from ponderosa pine resin
TLDR
Comparison of EAG traces suggests different receptors for the two stereoisomers ofα-pinene, and differential saturation curves suggest that while one set of receptors may respond to both enantiomers, some receptors respond only to the (S)-(−) enantiomer. Expand
Electrophysiological responses of Dendroctonus armandi (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) to volatiles of Chinese white pine as well as to pure enantiomers and racemates of some monoterpenes
TLDR
Most of the test compounds elicited similar responses, which suggested that several of the compounds may be used in combination by D. armandi in habitat and/or host community location at the Qinling forest ecosystem. Expand
Influence of enantiomers of α‐pinene on the response of the red pine cone beetle, Conophthorus resinosae to its pheromone pityol
TLDR
The enantiomeric specificity of bark beetle pheromones has been known for some time, but only recently has the importance of enantiomers of monoterpenes become recognised. Expand
Red turpentine beetle primary attraction to (–)-β-pinene+ethanol in US Pacific Northwest ponderosa pine forests
TLDR
(–)-β-Pinene+ethanol is currently the strongest kairomone lure for D. valens attraction in US northwest pine forests, and has value for beetle detection, monitoring, research, and management. Expand
Enantiospecific responses of southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) and its clerid predator, Thanasimus dubius, to α-pinene
TLDR
The preference of D. frontalis for (+)-α-pinene may affect its host selection behavior, and should be considered in population monitoring lures. Expand
Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of Dendroctonus valens to non-host volatiles
TLDR
Non-host volatiles tested for both electrophysiological and behavioral effects on the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, showed that attraction of D. valens to kairomone baited traps was reduced by all individual NHVs, with reductions ranging from 26.3 to 70%. Expand
The response of Dendroctonus valens and Temnochila chlorodia to Ips paraconfusus pheromone components and verbenone
TLDR
Test the response of D. valens and Temnochila chlorodia, a common bark beetle predator, to racemic ipsenol, racemic iipsdienol, and (−)-cis-verbenol (IPSR) in the presence and absence of two release rates of (−)-verbenone. Expand
Diversity and expression of P450 genes from Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in response to different kairomones.
TLDR
The results suggest that some of these genes may be involved in the detoxification process of these compounds during tree colonization, with some of them sex, antennae and gut region specific. Expand
Red Turpentine Beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), Response to Host Semiochemicals in China
Abstract The response of the introduced red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens LeConte, to host semiochemicals in Shanxi Province, China, was distinctly different from that reported in previousExpand
The effects of α‐pinene on the feeding performance and pheromone production of Dendroctonus valens
TLDR
The dual effects of α‐pinene inhibited the bark beetle's feeding activities and in turn the Bark beetle made use of it to produce pheromones, indicating the importance of promptly removing fresh stumps in the field for the management of the bark beetles. Expand
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The black turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier), utilizes the bicyclic ketals frontalin, produced by females, and exo -brevicomin, produced by males, as sex pheromones. The isomer endoExpand
Pheromonal attraction and allomonal interruption ofIps pini in California by the two enantiomers of ipsdienol
Air containing volatile compounds from around maleIps pini boring in ponderosa pine logs from California was condensed, fractionated by GC, and assayed in the laboratory and field. The only fractionExpand
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Observations and reports on the common furniture beetleAnobium punctatum suggested that, on emergence, females use a sex pheromone to attract males. GLC analysis of ovipositor extracts showed theExpand
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TLDR
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Traps baited with gum turpentine of southern pines and deployed in north Florida from 1980–1983 captured numerous adults of the black turpentine beetle (BTB), Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier); palesExpand
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TLDR
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