Chimpanzees recognize themselves in mirrors

@article{Povinelli1997ChimpanzeesRT,
  title={Chimpanzees recognize themselves in mirrors},
  author={Daniel J. Povinelli and Gordon G Gallup Jr and T. J. Eddy and Donna T. Bierschwale and Marti C Engstrom and Helen K Perilloux and Ido B. Toxopeus},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1997},
  volume={53},
  pages={1083-1088}
}
Abstract Heyes’ (1994, Anim. Behav., 97, 909–919; 1995, Anim. Behav., 50, 1533–1542) recent account of chimpanzees’, Pan troglodytes, reactions to mirrors challenged the view that they are capable of recognizing the equivalence between their mirror images and their physical appearance. In particular, she argued that observations that chimpanzees touch surreptitiously placed marks on their faces while in front of mirrors can be explained as an interaction between ambient levels of face touching… 

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