Chimpanzees Recruit the Best Collaborators

@article{Melis2006ChimpanzeesRT,
  title={Chimpanzees Recruit the Best Collaborators},
  author={Alicia P. Melis and Brian A. Hare and Michael Tomasello},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={1297 - 1300}
}
Humans collaborate with non-kin in special ways, but the evolutionary foundations of these collaborative skills remain unclear. We presented chimpanzees with collaboration problems in which they had to decide when to recruit a partner and which potential partner to recruit. In an initial study, individuals recruited a collaborator only when solving the problem required collaboration. In a second study, individuals recruited the more effective of two partners on the basis of their experience… Expand

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