Chimpanzee Tool Use in Dental Grooming

@article{McGrew1973ChimpanzeeTU,
  title={Chimpanzee Tool Use in Dental Grooming},
  author={W. McGrew and C. Tutin},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1973},
  volume={241},
  pages={477-478}
}
TOOL use by animals is characteristically restricted to agonistic, exploratory, or self-maintenance contexts, and we have only one record of its use in social grooming1. Belle, a female chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) at the Delta Regional Primate Research Center, used sticks as aids in grooming the teeth of other individuals, and on one occasion she fashioned a stick tool by stripping a twig of its leaves. In 135 h of observation over 6 weeks, we recorded forty-five bouts of dental grooming: four… Expand
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