Children Do Not Behave Like Adults: Gender Gaps in Performance and Risk Taking in a Random Social Context in the High�?Stakes Game Shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy

@article{SveSderbergh2014ChildrenDN,
  title={Children Do Not Behave Like Adults: Gender Gaps in Performance and Risk Taking in a Random Social Context in the High�?Stakes Game Shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy},
  author={Jenny S{\"a}ve-S{\"o}derbergh and Gabriella Sj{\"o}gren Lindquist},
  journal={Econometrics: Single Equation Models eJournal},
  year={2014}
}
Using unique panel data, we compare cognitive performance and wagering behavior of children (10-11 years) with adults playing in the Swedish version of the TV-shows Jeopardy and Junior Jeopardy. Although facing the same well-known high-stakes game, and controlling for performance differences, there is no gender gap in risk-taking among girls and boys in contrast with adults, and, while girls take more risk than women, boys take less risk than men. We also find that female behavior is… 
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