Childhood lymphoblastic cancer: subgroups defined by nonhuman primate antisera to human lymphatic leukemia cell antigens.

Abstract

Lymphoblasts from 23 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 10 with lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) were studied by complement-dependent microcytoxicity tests with two nonhuman primate antisera defining leukemia-associated and lymphoma-associated antigens. Cells form 15 patients with ALL and 1 with LBL reacted only with antiserum to chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL). These group-I patients were predominantly female. Most were pancytopenic and lacked mediastinal widening and T-cell markers; lymphoblasts from 15 were periodic acid-Schiff-positive. Cells from 8 male patients reacted only with antiserum to converted lymphosarcoma (LS). All these group-II patients expressed T-cell markers; 5 had mediastinal enlargement and 2, an abdominal mass. Six of the 8 were PAS-negative. Cells from 9 patients reacted with both antisera. The group-III patients demonstrated some characteristics of each of the above groups. Patients whose lymphoblasts reacted with CLL antiserum presented with clinical and laboratory features indicative of a good prognosis, i.e., ALL with PAS positivity and no T-cell markers or localized mass. Patients whose cells reacted with LS antiserum often had bad prognostic features: mediastinal or abdominal mass, expression of T-cell markers, and PAS negativity. These antisera appear able to differentiate childhood ALL from LBL. The distinction is important prognostically and perhaps therapeutically.

Cite this paper

@article{Raney1977ChildhoodLC, title={Childhood lymphoblastic cancer: subgroups defined by nonhuman primate antisera to human lymphatic leukemia cell antigens.}, author={Richard Beverly Raney and Thalachallour Mohanakumar and Richard S. Metzgar and Hie Won Hann and Milton H. Donaldson}, journal={Journal of the National Cancer Institute}, year={1977}, volume={58 5}, pages={1217-20} }