Childhood Socioeconomic Status Amplifies Genetic Effects on Adult Intelligence

@article{Bates2013ChildhoodSS,
  title={Childhood Socioeconomic Status Amplifies Genetic Effects on Adult Intelligence},
  author={Timothy C. Bates and Gary J. Lewis and Alexander Weiss},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={24},
  pages={2111 - 2116}
}
Studies of intelligence in children reveal significantly higher heritability among groups with high socioeconomic status (SES) than among groups with low SES. These interaction effects, however, have not been examined in adults, when between-families environmental effects are reduced. Using 1,702 adult twins (aged 24–84) for whom intelligence assessment data were available, we tested for interactions between childhood SES and genetic effects, between-families environmental effects, and unique… Expand

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