Childhood Onset Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus Does Not Resolve at Puberty: A Prospective Case Series

@article{Smith2009ChildhoodOV,
  title={Childhood Onset Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus Does Not Resolve at Puberty: A Prospective Case Series},
  author={Saxon D Smith and Gayle Fischer},
  journal={Pediatric Dermatology},
  year={2009},
  volume={26}
}
Abstract:  When vulvar lichen sclerosus occurs in prepubertal children it is widely believed that it is likely to remit at puberty. However when it occurs in adult women it is accepted that remission is unlikely and that in addition untreated or inadequately treated disease may be complicated by significant disturbance of vulvar architecture and less commonly squamous cell carcinoma. Our database reveals 18 girls who developed lichen sclerosus prior to puberty who are now adolescents or young… Expand
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Lichen sclerosus
W. B., Postbea~nter, 63 Jahre alt, Verkiihlungen ausgesetzt, bis auf geringe rheumatisehe Besehwerden aber vollkommen gesund. Urin normal. Erkrankung begann vor einem Jahr nach der Beobachtung desExpand
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