Childbirth and breast cancer prognosis

@article{Rosenberg2004ChildbirthAB,
  title={Childbirth and breast cancer prognosis},
  author={Lena U Rosenberg and Lukman Thalib and Hans-Olov Adami and Per Hall},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2004},
  volume={111}
}
Although certain risk factors for breast cancer incidence may also effect survival, findings have been inconsistent and the long‐term role of childbirth is unknown. We studied the influence of number and timing of births on breast cancer prognosis prospectively. From 1958 to 1997, altogether 32,003 women, born 1932 or later, were notified to the Swedish Cancer Registry due to a primary invasive breast cancer. We obtained information on dates of all childbirths and achieved complete follow‐up… 
Multiple births and breast cancer prognosis: A population based study
TLDR
It is concluded that breast cancer diagnosed within 5 years of childbirth, particularly if this or prior pregnancies have been multiple, should be regarded as a negative prognostic factor and considered in counselling and treatment of these patients.
Parity in relation to survival following breast cancer.
  • S. Butt, S. Borgquist, J. Manjer
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    European journal of surgical oncology : the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology
  • 2009
Sex of first child and breast cancer survival: A population‐based study
TLDR
This study, the largest up to date, failed to identify evidence to support the proposed association between the sex of the first child and breast cancer survival.
Reproductive factors and histologic subtype in relation to mortality after a breast cancer diagnosis
TLDR
Increasing parity reduced mortality in ductal and lobular breast cancer is found and the number of full-term births, rather than age at first birth, has an effect on both breast cancer-specific and overall mortality.
Association between reproductive factors and breast cancer survival in younger women
TLDR
Results may help elucidate breast cancer progression mechanisms and enable a better understanding of how reproductive characteristics influence breast cancer survival.
Breastfeeding Associated with Reduced Mortality in Women with Breast Cancer.
TLDR
A total breastfeeding history >6 months and pregnancy are associated with both greater overall and breast cancer-specific survival for women diagnosed with breast cancer, having lived long enough for other causes of death to contribute substantially to mortality.
Tumor characteristics and prognosis in women with pregnancy‐associated breast cancer
TLDR
The poorer prognosis observed in women with PABC appears to be largely explained by more adverse tumor characteristics at diagnosis, including more advanced T and N stage, and higher proportions of ER/PR negative, HER2 positive and triple‐negative tumors.
Association of Parity and Time since Last Birth with Breast Cancer Prognosis by Intrinsic Subtype
TLDR
Parity and recent birth are associated with worse survival among breast cancer patients, particularly among luminal breast cancers and long-term survivors, and the biologic effects of parity and birth recency may extend from etiology to tumor promotion and progression.
Placental Weight and Breast Cancer Survival in Young Women
TLDR
Increasing placental weight is associated with reduced breast cancer survival, consistent with the hypothesis that the reduced survival in breast cancer among women with a recent childbirth is linked to pregnancy hormone exposure.
Age at first childbirth and breast cancer survival: a prospective cohort study
TLDR
This study examined age at first birth in relation to survival after breast cancer diagnosis and could not see any negative effect of late first childbirth on breast cancer specific survival.
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Low age at first childbirth, but not parity, was associated with a poor prognosis of breast cancer, and it is speculated whether women who develop breast cancer despite an early first full-term pregnancy might represent a selected group with a more malignant disease.
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Evidence is provided that reproductive factors influence the biological behavior of breast cancer in young women and prognosis and Clinicians need to be aware that women who have delivered a child in < 2 years before diagnosis are at increased risk of having tumors with especially adverse prognostic profiles and have a poorer survival rate than women who are nulliparous or whose last birth was some years in the past.
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A diagnosis of breast cancer less than 2 years after having given birth is associated with a particularly poor survival irrespective of the stage of disease at debut and a recent pregnancy should be regarded as a negative prognostic factor and considered in counselling these patients and in the decisions regarding adjuvant treatment.
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Cancers associated with childbearing pose extremely difficult questions for the patient and her physician. Population based registry data gave us the opportunity to examine the incidence of this
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