Chick provisioning and nest attendance of male and female Wilson’s storm petrels Oceanites oceanicus

@article{Gladbach2009ChickPA,
  title={Chick provisioning and nest attendance of male and female Wilson’s storm petrels Oceanites oceanicus},
  author={Anja Gladbach and Cristina Braun and Anja Nordt and H. U. Peter and Petra Quillfeldt},
  journal={Polar Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={32},
  pages={1315-1321}
}
Seabirds show a range of patterns of sexual size dimorphism and sex-specific parental investment, but the underlying causes remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to test two longstanding hypotheses of parental investment in a sexually monomorphic species, Wilson’s storm petrel Oceanites oceanicus, namely that males attend chicks more frequently and females deliver larger meals (Beck and Brown in Br Antarct Surv Sci Rep 69:1–54, 1972). We recorded in eight seasons, both… Expand

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