Chicanos in Higher Education: The Politics of Self-Interest

@article{Gndara1986ChicanosIH,
  title={Chicanos in Higher Education: The Politics of Self-Interest},
  author={Patricia G{\'a}ndara},
  journal={American Journal of Education},
  year={1986},
  volume={95},
  pages={256 - 272}
}
  • P. Gándara
  • Published 1986
  • Sociology
  • American Journal of Education
Higher education in the United States continues to be distributed unequally, with Mexican-Americans receiving less than their fair share. In California, the state with the largest number of Mexican-Americans, 21 percent of non-Hispanic whites have at least a B.A. degree whereas only 6 percent of Hispanics are similarly well educated. At the other end of the spectrum, Mexican-Americans are found disproportionately among the ranks of the undereducated and the underemployed. Up to now, concerns… Expand
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