Chest Compression Injuries Detected via Routine Post-arrest Care in Patients Who Survive to Admission after Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest

@article{Boland2015ChestCI,
  title={Chest Compression Injuries Detected via Routine Post-arrest Care in Patients Who Survive to Admission after Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest},
  author={Lori L. Boland and Paul A. Satterlee and John Smith Hokanson and Craig E. Strauss and Dana Yost},
  journal={Prehospital Emergency Care},
  year={2015},
  volume={19},
  pages={23 - 30}
}
Abstract Objective. To examine injuries produced by chest compressions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients who survive to hospital admission. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among 235 consecutive patients who were hospitalized after nontraumatic OHCA in Minnesota between January 2009 and May 2012 (117 survived to discharge; 118 died during hospitalization). Cases were eligible if the patient had received prehospital compressions from an emergency medical… Expand
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