Chemosensory cues allow courting male garter snakes to assess body length and body condition of potential mates

@article{Shine2003ChemosensoryCA,
  title={Chemosensory cues allow courting male garter snakes to assess body length and body condition of potential mates},
  author={Richard Shine and Ben L. Phillips and Heather L. Waye and Michael P. Lemaster and Robert T. Mason},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={54},
  pages={162-166}
}
When choosing between two potential mates, a male may benefit by picking a larger (longer and/or more heavy-bodied) female because she is likely to produce more or larger offspring. Males of many species use visual cues to evaluate the sizes of their mates, but in some situations (at night or in a crowded mating swarm), vision may be useless. Potentially, males may be able to use chemical cues that convey information about female body size. We manipulated cues available to free-ranging male… 

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...

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