Chemokine receptor CCR2 is not essential for the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

Abstract

Infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA induces cerebral malaria in susceptible mice. Brain-sequestered CD8(+) T cells are responsible for this pathology. We have evaluated the role of CCR2, a chemokine receptor expressed on CD8(+) T cells. Infected CCR2-deficient mice were as susceptible to cerebral malaria as wild-type mice were, and CD8(+) T-cell migration to the brain was not abolished.

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@article{Belnoue2003ChemokineRC, title={Chemokine receptor CCR2 is not essential for the development of experimental cerebral malaria.}, author={Elodie Belnoue and F{\'a}bio T. M. Costa and Ana Margarida Vig{\'a}rio and Tatiana Voza and Françoise Gonnet and Ir{\`e}ne Landau and Nico van van Rooijen and Matthias Mack and William A. Kuziel and Laurent R{\'e}nia}, journal={Infection and immunity}, year={2003}, volume={71 6}, pages={3648-51} }