Chemical ecology of marine organisms: An overview

@article{Bakus2005ChemicalEO,
  title={Chemical ecology of marine organisms: An overview},
  author={G. J. Bakus and N. Targett and B. Schulte},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={12},
  pages={951-987}
}
An overview of marine chemical ecology is presented. Emphasis is placed on antipredation, invertebrate-toxic host relationships, antifouling, competition for space, species dominance, and the chemistry of ecological interactions. 
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