Chemical defenses and the susceptibility of tropical marine brown algae to herbivores

@article{Steinberg2004ChemicalDA,
  title={Chemical defenses and the susceptibility of tropical marine brown algae to herbivores},
  author={Peter D. Steinberg},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={69},
  pages={628-630}
}
SummaryI assayed phenolic and tannin concentrations in a number of species of temperate and tropical brown algae of the genera Sargassum and Turbinaria. Tropical species in both genera contained consistently low levels of phenolics and tannins (species means ranged between 0 and 1.6% [measured as % dry weight of the thallus]). Levels of phenolics in temperate species of Sargassum were variable and consistently much higher than in tropical species (species means ranged between 3 and 12% by dry… 
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