Chemical composition of epicuticular wax crystals on the slippery zone in pitchers of five Nepenthes species and hybrids

@article{Riedel2006ChemicalCO,
  title={Chemical composition of epicuticular wax crystals on the slippery zone in pitchers of five Nepenthes species and hybrids},
  author={Michael Riedel and Anna Eichner and Harald Meimberg and Reinhard Jetter},
  journal={Planta},
  year={2006},
  volume={225},
  pages={1517-1534}
}
Plants of the carnivorous genus Nepenthes efficiently trap insects in leaf pitchers, mostly employing epicuticular wax crystals on the pitcher walls to make them slippery for the prey. In the present study, the compositions and micromorphologies of the wax crystals of five Nepenthes species and hybrids were analysed in order to test whether the chemical principles underlying this ecological function are widespread within the genus. Three wax layers could be distinguished within the Nepenthes… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF THE EPICUTICULAR WAXE OF TWO BREED WHEAT CULTIVARS
TLDR
The evaluation of the epicuticular waxes and the molecular arrangement within the crystals were studied on biological and non-biological surfaces from wax platelets of leaves blades of two wheat cultivars: Inia66 and Uruq to reveal differences between two cultivars.
Slippery or sticky? Functional diversity in the trapping strategy of Nepenthes carnivorous plants.
TLDR
Investigating whether Nepenthes species exhibit diverse trapping strategies and measuring the amount of slippery wax on the pitcher walls of 23 taxa and the viscoelasticity of their digestive liquid and compared their retention efficiency on ants and flies suggested the possibility of an investment trade-off for the plants.
A Viscoelastic Deadly Fluid in Carnivorous Pitcher Plants
TLDR
The viscoelastic trap constitutes a cryptic but potentially widespread adaptation of Nepenthes species and could be a homologous trait shared through common ancestry with the sundew (Drosera) flypaper plants.
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References

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TLDR
Solubility data indicate that the Nepenthes crystals contained polymeric forms of this aldehyde, and the resulting mechanical properties of the polymer crystals and the mechanism of slipperiness are discussed.
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TLDR
The composition and spatial arrangement of cuticular waxes on the leaves of Prunus laurocerasus were investigated and the ecological relevance of this layered structure for recognition by phytotrophic fungi and herbivorous insects that probe the surface composition for sign stimuli is discussed.
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TLDR
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TLDR
The pitchers of the tropical carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata are highly specialized organs for the attraction and capture of insects and absorption of nutrients from them with particular focus on the nectaries and digestive glands.
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TLDR
The pitchers of the tropical carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata are highly specialized organs for the attraction and capture of insects and absorption of nutrients from them with particular focus on the nectaries and digestive glands.
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TLDR
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TLDR
The genus Macaranga represents one of the few cases known so far where epicuticular wax crystals are likely to have evolved in relation to insects and act as an ecological isolation mechanism for the sympiotic ants.
Chemical genetics of wax formation on leaves of pisum sativum
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