Chemical Exposures of Women Workers in the Plastics Industry with Particular Reference to Breast Cancer and Reproductive Hazards

@article{Dematteo2012ChemicalEO,
  title={Chemical Exposures of Women Workers in the Plastics Industry with Particular Reference to Breast Cancer and Reproductive Hazards},
  author={Robert Dematteo and Margaret M. Keith and James T Brophy and A. P. William Wordsworth and Andrew Watterson and Matthias P. Beck and Anne Rochon and F. Buchman Michael and Gilbertson Jyoti and Pharityal Magali and Rootham Dayna and Nadine Scott},
  journal={NEW SOLUTIONS: A Journal of Environmental and Occupational Health Policy},
  year={2012},
  volume={22},
  pages={427 - 448}
}
Despite concern about the harmful effects of substances contained in various plastic consumer products, little attention has focused on the more heavily exposed women working in the plastics industry. Through a review of the toxicology, industrial hygiene, and epidemiology literatures in conjunction with qualitative research, this article explores occupational exposures in producing plastics and health risks to workers, particularly women, who make up a large part of the workforce. The review… 
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