Checking email less frequently reduces stress

@article{Kushlev2015CheckingEL,
  title={Checking email less frequently reduces stress},
  author={Kostadin Kushlev and Elizabeth W. Dunn},
  journal={Comput. Hum. Behav.},
  year={2015},
  volume={43},
  pages={220-228}
}
Limiting the frequency of checking email throughout the day reduced daily stress.Lower daily stress predicts greater well-being (e.g., higher positive affect).The frequency of checking email did not directly impact other well-being outcomes. Using email is one of the most common online activities in the world today. Yet, very little experimental research has examined the effect of email on well-being. Utilizing a within-subjects design, we investigated how the frequency of checking email… Expand

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