Check-list for scientific names of common parasitic fungi. Series 3b: Fungi on bulbs: Amaryllidaceae and Iridaceae

@article{Boerema2005ChecklistFS,
  title={Check-list for scientific names of common parasitic fungi. Series 3b: Fungi on bulbs: Amaryllidaceae and Iridaceae},
  author={G. H. Boerema and Maria E. C. Hamers},
  journal={Netherlands Journal of Plant Pathology},
  year={2005},
  volume={95},
  pages={1-29}
}
This list is a continuation of Series 3a (Neth. J. Pl. Path. 94 (1988), Supplement 1), an account of the nomenclature of common parasitic fungi on bulbs as used in official publications of the Netherlands Society of Plant Pathology and the Netherlands Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. The selected names include one new species,Curvularia gladioli Boerema & Hamers, one new pathogenic form,Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.croci Boerema & Hamers, and one new combination,Sclerotium narcissi (Sacc… 

Check-list for scientific names of common parasitic fungi. Series 3c: Fungi on bulbs: ‘additional crops’ belonging to the Araceae, Begoniaceae, Compositae, Oxalidaceae and Ranunculaceae

TLDR
This list is a continuation and also the ending of Series 3c, an account of the nomenclature of parasitic fungi on bulbs as used in official publications of the Netherlands Society of Plant Pathology and the Netherlands Ministry of Agriculture, Nature Management and Fisheries.

Epitypification of Fusarium oxysporum – clearing the taxonomic chaos

TLDR
Using multi-locus phylogenetic inference and subtle morphological differences with the newly established epitype of F. oxysporum as reference point, 15 cryptic taxa are resolved in this study and described as species.

Physiological races and vegetative compatibility groups within Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. gladioli

TLDR
The pathogenicity and vegetative compatibility of mainly Dutch isolates ofFusarium oxysporum collected from diseased gladioli and other Iridaceae were investigated and it was found that all self-compatible isolates belonged to one of three distinct vegetative Compatibility Group (VCG) and were incompatible with isolates that were not pathogenic to gladiolus.

Fungi occurring on narcissus plantation in annual and biennial croppingGrzyby występujące na plantacji narcyza w jednorocznym i dwuletnim cyklu uprawy

TLDR
The obtained results indicated the necessity of digging up the bulbs every year and rotation of cropping place to reduce possible risk of smoulder and Fusarium rot in the secound year of subsequent cropping.

Three new graminicolous species of Curvularia (anamorphic fungi) from Queensland, Australia

Three new species of Cuvularia, C. bothriochloae sp. nov., C. micrairae sp. nov. and C.queenslandica sp. nov., isolated from grass hosts in Queensland are described, illustrated and compared with

Pathogenic, Genetic and Molecular Characterisation of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lilii

Isolates of Fusarium oxysporum from lily were screened for pathogenicity, vegetative compatibility and DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and compared to reference isolates of F.

Infection process of Curvularia gladioli on gladiolus leaves

TLDR
Inoculated leaf samples of the Gladiolus grandiflorus ‘T-704’ and ‘Veronica’ varieties were obtained 1 to 192 h after inoculation, and insights into the infection process of C. gladioli on gladiolus leaves are provided.

Novel Curvularia species from clinical specimens

TLDR
Morphology and phylogeny supported the proposal of five new species in Curvularia, which were named after representative species, namely americana, eragrostidis, hominis, lunata, spicifera and trifolii, and the existence of six clades, which are associated with particular morphological features.

References

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Check-list for scientific names of common parasitic fungi. Series 2d: Fungi on field crops: Vegetables and cruciferous crops

TLDR
This list is a continuation of Series 2a, b, and c, an account of the nomenclature of common parasitic fungi on field crops as used in official publications of the Netherlands Society of Plant Pathology and the Netherlands Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries.

Check-list for scientific names of common parasitic fungi. Series 3a: Fungi on bulbs: Liliaceae

This list gives a first account on the nomenclature of common parasitic fungi on bulbs as used in official publications of the Netherlands Society of Plant Pathology and the Netherlands Ministry of

International code of botanical nomenclature: adopted by the Fourteenth International Botanical Congress, Berlin, July-August 1987

International code of botanical nomenclature: adopted by the Fourteenth International Botanical Congress, Berlin, July-August 1987 , International code of botanical nomenclature: adopted by the

The fungus is not only found on narcissus bulbs but also recorded from freesia corms, see Boerema in Versl

  • De Hoog & Scheffer in Mycologia
  • 1984

no Latin diagnosis

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1.c. For the differentiating characters in relation to the medium used for nutrition, see also the studies by Menzinger in Zentbl

  • Bakt. ParasitKde Abt
  • 1966

Botrytis narcissicola Klebahn in .lb

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  • 1906

Note: This plurivorous Grey Mould (Dutch: 'Grauwe schimmel') was already discussed in Ser. 3a: Fungi on Liliaceae [in Neth

  • J. P1
  • 1988

May]. H = Phyllosticta narcissi Oudemans in Ned

  • kruidk. Archf III,
  • 1900

treated Heterosporium as a synonym of Cladosporium Link : Ft. The genus Heterosporium was re-introduced by Von Arx, Gen

  • Utrecht/Baarn]
  • 1952