• Corpus ID: 55637

Chaucer and Old Norse Mythology

@inproceedings{Mcturk2000ChaucerAO,
  title={Chaucer and Old Norse Mythology},
  author={Rory Mcturk},
  year={2000}
}
In a paper currently awaiting publication I have argued that the story in Skáldskaparmál of Ó›inn’s theft of the poetic mead is an analogue to the story told in Chaucer’s House of Fame, for three main reasons. First, both stories may be said to involve an eagle as a mediator between different kinds of poetry: in Snorri’s account Ó›inn in the form of an eagle expels, apparently from the front and back ends of its body, two portions of the mead, which represent poetry and poetastery respectively… 

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
Quoted from O'Meara's translation (1982) as cited in note 6, above
    xxiv-xxv, and [Geoffrey] Chaucer, The House of Fame
    • 1988
    Svava Jakobsdóttir, 239, implies that the guardian of the Soma, who shoots an arrow after the eagle, is a snake
    • Cf. Calasso
    • 1999