Charcot and Cholesterin

@article{Walusinski2019CharcotAC,
  title={Charcot and Cholesterin},
  author={Olivier Walusinski},
  journal={European Neurology},
  year={2019},
  volume={81},
  pages={309 - 318}
}
  • O. Walusinski
  • Published 5 September 2019
  • Medicine
  • European Neurology
We offer here an observation written in 1866 by Jean-Martin Charcot, accompanied by drawings made during the autopsy of a patient who died of “cerebral softening.” Focusing mainly on French medical progress at the time, our survey of the state of knowledge of cerebrovascular pathology indicates that Charcot completely explained the pathophysiology of cerebral infarction, describing the ulceration of an atheromatous plaque at the intima of an artery, on which a clot aggregates, blocks the vessel… 
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