Characterizing computer input with Fitts' law parameters-the information and non-information aspects of pointing

@article{Zhai2004CharacterizingCI,
  title={Characterizing computer input with Fitts' law parameters-the information and non-information aspects of pointing},
  author={Shumin Zhai},
  journal={Int. J. Hum. Comput. Stud.},
  year={2004},
  volume={61},
  pages={791-809}
}
  • Shumin Zhai
  • Published 1 December 2004
  • Computer Science
  • Int. J. Hum. Comput. Stud.

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