Characterization of the decision-making deficit of patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex lesions.

@article{Bechara2000CharacterizationOT,
  title={Characterization of the decision-making deficit of patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex lesions.},
  author={Antoine Bechara and Daniel Tranel and Hanna Damasio},
  journal={Brain : a journal of neurology},
  year={2000},
  volume={123 ( Pt 11)},
  pages={
          2189-202
        }
}
On a gambling task that models real-life decisions, patients with bilateral lesions of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VM) opt for choices that yield high immediate gains in spite of higher future losses. In this study, we addressed three possibilities that may account for this behaviour: (i) hypersensitivity to reward; (ii) insensitivity to punishment; and (iii) insensitivity to future consequences, such that behaviour is always guided by immediate prospects. For this purpose, we designed… 

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