Characterization of the 1918 "Spanish" influenza virus neuraminidase gene.

@article{Reid2000CharacterizationOT,
  title={Characterization of the 1918 "Spanish" influenza virus neuraminidase gene.},
  author={Ann H. Reid and Thomas G. Fanning and Thomas A. Janczewski and Jeffery K. Taubenberger},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2000},
  volume={97 12},
  pages={
          6785-90
        }
}
The "Spanish" influenza pandemic of 1918 was characterized by exceptionally high mortality, especially among young adults. The surface proteins of influenza viruses, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, play important roles in virulence, host specificity, and the human immune response. The complete coding sequence of hemagglutinin was reported last year. This laboratory has now determined the complete coding sequence of the neuraminidase gene of the 1918 virus. Influenza RNA fragments were isolated… Expand
The origin and virulence of the 1918 "Spanish" influenza virus.
  • J. Taubenberger
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society
  • 2006
TLDR
Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the completed 1918 influenza virus genes shows them to be the most avian-like among the mammalian-adapted viruses, which supports the hypotheses that (1) the pandemic virus contains genes derived from avan-like influenza virus strains and (2) the 1918 virus is the common ancestor of human and classical swine H1N1 influenza viruses. Expand
Integrating historical, clinical and molecular genetic data in order to explain the origin and virulence of the 1918 Spanish influenza virus.
TLDR
Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the complete 1918 haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes support the hypothesis that the pandemic virus contained surface protein-encoding genes derived from an avian influenza strain and that the 1918 virus is very similar to the common ancestor of human and classical swine H1N1 influenza strains. Expand
The virulence of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus: unraveling the enigma.
TLDR
Sequence analysis of the 1918 influenza virus is allowing us to test hypotheses as to the origin and virulence of this strain, and results suggest that in human cells the 1918 NS1 is a very effective interferon antagonist. Expand
The haemagglutinin gene, but not the neuraminidase gene, of 'Spanish flu' was a recombinant.
  • M. Gibbs, J. Armstrong, A. Gibbs
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2001
TLDR
Reanalysed the sequences of the three 1918 genes and found conflicting patterns of relatedness in all three, showing that the patterns in its haemagglutinin (HA) gene were produced by true recombination between two different parental HA H1 subtype genes, but that the conflicting patterns inIts neuraminidase and non-structural-nuclear export proteins genes resulted from selection. Expand
Enhanced virulence of influenza A viruses with the haemagglutinin of the 1918 pandemic virus
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the HA of the 1918 virus confers enhanced pathogenicity in mice to recent human viruses that are otherwise non-pathogenic in this host. Expand
Sequence of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus nonstructural gene (NS) segment and characterization of recombinant viruses bearing the 1918 NS genes
TLDR
The sequence of the A/Brevig Mission/1/18 (H1N1) virus nonstructural (NS) segment encoding two proteins, NS1 and nuclear export protein is reported, suggesting that interaction of the NS1 protein with host-cell factors plays a significant role in viral pathogenesis. Expand
The Low-pH Stability Discovered in Neuraminidase of 1918 Pandemic Influenza A Virus Enhances Virus Replication
TLDR
It is shown that the avian-like low-pH stability of sialidase activity discovered in the 1918 pandemic virus NA contributes to the viral replication efficiency. Expand
Divergent evolution of hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes in recent influenza A:H3N2 viruses isolated in Canada
TLDR
It appears that recent influenza strains continue to evolve from a reassortant produced during the cocirculation of the two above variants, as well as some strains whose HA genes were closely related showed significant differences in their NA genes and conversely. Expand
The predicted antigenicity of the haemagglutinin of the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic suggests an avian origin.
  • G. Brownlee, E. Fodor
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2001
TLDR
The hypothesis that the human 1918 pandemic originated from an avian virus of the H1 subtype that crossed the species barrier from birds to humans and adapted to humans, presumably by mutation and/or reassortment, shortly before 1918 is supported. Expand
Characterization of the 1918 “Spanish” Influenza Virus Matrix Gene Segment
TLDR
The 1918 sequence matches other mammalian strains at 4 amino acids in the extracellular domain of M2 that differ consistently between avian and mammalian strains, suggesting that the matrix segment may have been circulating in human strains for at least several years before 1918. Expand
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