Characterization of decision commitment rule alterations during an auditory change detection task.

@article{Johnson2017CharacterizationOD,
  title={Characterization of decision commitment rule alterations during an auditory change detection task.},
  author={Bridgette Johnson and Rebeka Verma and Man-ying Sun and Timothy D. Hanks},
  journal={Journal of neurophysiology},
  year={2017},
  volume={118 5},
  pages={
          2526-2536
        }
}
A critical component of decision making is determining when to commit to a choice. This involves stopping rules that specify the requirements for decision commitment. Flexibility of decision stopping rules provides an important means of control over decision-making processes. In many situations, these stopping rules establish a balance between premature decisions and late decisions. In this study we use a novel change detection paradigm to examine how subjects control this balance when invoking… 

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