Characterization of a virus infecting Citrus volkameriana with citrus leprosis-like symptoms.

@article{Melzer2012CharacterizationOA,
  title={Characterization of a virus infecting Citrus volkameriana with citrus leprosis-like symptoms.},
  author={Michael J. Melzer and Diane M. Sether and Wayne B. Borth and John S. Hu},
  journal={Phytopathology},
  year={2012},
  volume={102 1},
  pages={
          122-7
        }
}
A Citrus volkameriana tree displaying symptoms similar to citrus leprosis on its leaves and bark was found in Hawaii. Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C)-specific detection assays, however, were negative for all tissues tested. Short, bacilliform virus-like particles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the cytoplasm of symptomatic leaves but not in healthy controls. Double-stranded (ds) RNAs ≈8 and 3 kbp in size were present in symptomatic leaf tissue but not in healthy controls… 

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