Characterization of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 type III secretion-dependent hemolytic activity in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

Abstract

A number of bacteria that are pathogenic for animals and plants possess a type III secretion system (TTSS) to translocate virulence-associated proteins into host cells. In several bacteria, it has been reported that the TTSS is correlated with an ability to cause contact-dependent hemolysis in vitro. Here, we showed that the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 exhibited Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 type III secretion-dependent, contact-mediated, hemolytic activity. Mutations with a single deletion in genes encoding putative pore-forming proteins, SipB and SipC, secreted by the TTSS abolished hemolytic activity. In addition, the osmoprotection studies revealed that molecules larger than PEG2000 conferred significant protection against lysis induced by Salmonella. These results indicate that the hemolysis generated by Salmonella is due to the formation of pores within the erythrocyte membrane.

Cite this paper

@article{Miki2004CharacterizationOS, title={Characterization of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 type III secretion-dependent hemolytic activity in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.}, author={Tsuyoshi Miki and Nobuhiko Okada and Yukie Shimada and Hirofumi Danbara}, journal={Microbial pathogenesis}, year={2004}, volume={37 2}, pages={65-72} }