Characteristics of Patients with Gaze-evoked Tinnitus

@article{Coad2001CharacteristicsOP,
  title={Characteristics of Patients with Gaze-evoked Tinnitus},
  author={Mary Lou Coad and Alan H. Lockwood and Richard J. Salvi and Robert F. Burkard},
  journal={Otology \& Neurotology},
  year={2001},
  volume={22},
  pages={650-654}
}
Objective The authors describe symptoms and population characteristics in subjects who can modulate the loudness and/or pitch of their tinnitus by eye movements. Study Design Data were obtained by questionnaire. Setting The study was conducted at a university center and a tertiary care center. Patients Respondents had the self-reported ability to modulate their tinnitus with eye movements. Results Ninety-one subjects reported having gaze-evoked tinnitus after posterior fossa surgery involving… Expand
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TLDR
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