Characterisation of human monocarboxylate transporter 4 substantiates its role in lactic acid efflux from skeletal muscle

@article{Fox2000CharacterisationOH,
  title={Characterisation of human monocarboxylate transporter 4 substantiates its role in lactic acid efflux from skeletal muscle},
  author={Jocelyn E. Manning Fox and D. Meredith and A. Halestrap},
  journal={The Journal of Physiology},
  year={2000},
  volume={529}
}
1 Monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 4 is the major monocarboxylate transporter isoform present in white skeletal muscle and is responsible for the efflux of lactic acid produced by glycolysis. Here we report the characterisation of MCT4 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 2 The protein was correctly targeted to the plasma membrane and rates of substrate transport were determined from the rate of intracellular acidification monitored with the pH‐sensitive dye 2′,7′‐bis‐(carboxyethyl)‐5(6… Expand
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TLDR
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