Character and Spatial Distribution of OH/H2O on the Surface of the Moon Seen by M3 on Chandrayaan-1

@article{Pieters2009CharacterAS,
  title={Character and Spatial Distribution of OH/H2O on the Surface of the Moon Seen by M3 on Chandrayaan-1},
  author={Carle M. Pieters and Jyotindra Narayan Goswami and Roger N. Clark and Mylswamy Annadurai and Joseph W. Boardman and Bonnie J. Buratti and J.-Ph. Combe and Melinda Darby Dyar and Robert O. Green and James W. Head and Charles A. Hibbitts and Michael D. Hicks and Peter J. Isaacson and Rachel L. Klima and G. Y. Kramer and S. Kumar and Eric Livo and Stephen R. Lundeen and Erick R. Malaret and Thomas B. McCord and John F. Mustard and Jeffrey Wyatt Nettles and Noah E. Petro and Cassandra Runyon and Matthew Staid and Jessica M. Sunshine and L. A. Taylor and Stefanie Tompkins and Padma Prabodh Varanasi},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={326},
  pages={568 - 572}
}
Lunar Water The Moon has been thought to be primarily anhydrous, although there has been some evidence for accumulated ice in permanently shadowed craters near its poles (see the Perspective by Lucey, published online 24 September). By analyzing recent infrared mapping by Chandrayaan-1 and Deep Impact, and reexamining Cassini data obtained during its early flyby of the Moon, Pieters et al. (p. 568, published online 24 September), Sunshine et al. (p. 565, published online 24 September), and… 
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Water on the surface of the Moon as seen by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper: Distribution, abundance, and origins
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Using the near-infrared spectral reflectance data of the Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) instrument, we report an unusually bright structure of 30 × 60 km2 on the lunar equatorial farside
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Detection of Adsorbed Water and Hydroxyl on the Moon
TLDR
Space-based spectroscopic measurements provide evidence for water or hydroxyl (OH) on the surface of the Moon and imply that solar wind is depositing and/or somehow forming water and OH in minerals near the lunar surface, and that this trapped water is dynamic.
Temporal and Spatial Variability of Lunar Hydration As Observed by the Deep Impact Spacecraft
TLDR
Analysis of recent infrared mapping by Chandrayaan-1 and Deep Impact and reexamining Cassini data obtained during its early flyby of the Moon reveals a noticeable absorption signal for H2O and OH across much of the surface, suggesting solar wind is depositing and/or somehow forming water and OH in minerals near the lunar surface, and that this trapped water is dynamic.
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