Character, ‘Ordered Liberty’, and the Mission to Civilise: British Moral Justification of Empire, 1870–1914

@article{Cain2012CharacterL,
  title={Character, ‘Ordered Liberty’, and the Mission to Civilise: British Moral Justification of Empire, 1870–1914},
  author={Peter J. Cain},
  journal={The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History},
  year={2012},
  volume={40},
  pages={557 - 578}
}
  • P. Cain
  • Published 26 October 2012
  • History, Economics
  • The Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History
In a path-breaking study of the thought of Sir Henry Maine, Karuna Mantena has recently argued that the overthrow, in the second half of the nineteenth century, of the liberal imperialism promoted by Macaulay and James Mill meant that the ‘civilising mission’ became a mere alibi for continued British rule in the empire and that it was drained of all moral content. The article demonstrates, using a wide range of contemporary sources, that, although many British imperialists thought that Asian… 

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