• Corpus ID: 2365648

Chapter 8 The Role of Sequential Learning in Language Evolution : Computational and Experimental Studies

@inproceedings{Christiansen2001Chapter8T,
  title={Chapter 8 The Role of Sequential Learning in Language Evolution : Computational and Experimental Studies},
  author={Morten H. Christiansen and Rick Dale and Michelle Renee Ellefson and Christopher M. Conway},
  year={2001}
}

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