Changing views of brain evolution

@article{Northcutt2001ChangingVO,
  title={Changing views of brain evolution},
  author={R. Northcutt},
  journal={Brain Research Bulletin},
  year={2001},
  volume={55},
  pages={663-674}
}
  • R. Northcutt
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Brain Research Bulletin
Although brain studies began in ancient Egypt, speculations on vertebrate brain evolution occurred only much later, after the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species in 1859. Subsequently, views of brain evolution have been shaped by a complex interplay of theory and technique. Darwin's theory allowed the variation in brain size and complexity to be re-interpreted within an evolutionary context, albeit an erroneous pre-Darwinian context based on scala naturae. With the development of… Expand
Avian brains and a new understanding of vertebrate brain evolution
pallium is nuclear, and the mammalian cortex is laminar in organization, the avian pallium supports cognitive abilities similar to, and for some species more advanced than, those of many mammals. ToExpand
Comparative Neurobiology: History
TLDR
Progress has accelerated since the 1960s due to the discovery of identified neurons in invertebrates, and developments in axonal tracing, microelectrode recording and staining, molecular genetics, phylogenetic systematics, and network analysis. Expand
Cortical evolution and human behaviour
  • D. Neill
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Brain Research Bulletin
  • 2007
TLDR
It is concluded that a continuation of previous trends in isocortical evolution maybe inadequate to explain human behavioural flexibility and several possible departures from previous trends that would be compatible with increased behavioural flexibility are suggested. Expand
Ludwig Edinger: The Vertebrate Series and Comparative Neuroanatomy
  • Paul E. Patton
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of the history of the neurosciences
  • 2015
At the end of the nineteenth century, Ludwig Edinger completed the first comparative survey of the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate brains. He is regarded as the founder of the field of comparativeExpand
Bird Brain: Evolution
This article presents the classic and modern views of avian brain evolution in the context of vertebrate brain evolution. The classical view held that the avian cerebrum along with those of otherExpand
Understanding Vertebrate Brain Evolution1
  • R. Northcutt
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Integrative and comparative biology
  • 2002
TLDR
The emerging field of evolutionary developmental biology appears to be the most promising approach for revealing how changes in development and its processes produce neural changes, including the emergence of novel features. Expand
On the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate cortex
TLDR
The overall results of the four studies demonstrated an unforeseen level of conservation of the basic microcircuitry, cytoarchitecture, cell-types, efferent connectivity and sensorimotor organisation of the lamprey LPal/cortex providing compelling evidence for common ancestry with the mammalian neocortex. Expand
A History of Ideas in Evolutionary Neuroscience
Abstract The field of evolutionary neuroscience is more than 100 years old, and it has deep pre-evolutionary roots. Because that illustrious history has been reviewed repeatedly (Northcutt, 2001;Expand
Organization and evolution of the avian forebrain.
TLDR
The modern view of avian forebrain organization recognizes that the avian basal ganglia occupies no more of the telencephalon than is typically the case in mammals, and that it plays a role in motor control and motor learning as in mammals. Expand
Mechanisms of Early Brain Morphogenesis
TLDR
It is shown that enhancing contractility in the embryonic chicken brain induces morphologies reminiscent of more primitive species such as frog and fish, which begins to establish the framework necessary to connect early-stage mechanisms to interspecies differences in brain morphogenesis that occur during later development. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 98 REFERENCES
The gospel of the fossil brain: Tilly Edinger and the science of paleoneurology
TLDR
Tilly Edinger's research, her insistence on a stratigraphic and evolutionary framework for interpretation, and her massive compilations of paleoneurological literature established her as the leading definer, practitioner, and chronicler of her field. Expand
Evolution of the Vertebrate Central Nervous System: Patterns and Processes
TLDR
Analysis of a number of CNS characters that are usually assumed to be homologous reveals that homoplasous characters appear among them, and definitions of homology and homoplasy are reviewed, as are the concepts that bear on their application. Expand
A General Profile of the Vertebrate Brain, with Sidelights on the Ancestry of Cerebral Cortex
TLDR
The reconstruction of the “tree of evolution,” one of the most constantly pursued goals of biology, is attended by numerous difficulties, foremost among which is the circumstance that existing forms of life represent little more than “leaves on the ends of branches” of a tree. Expand
Primate brain evolution.
TLDR
This is not an introduction to the subject; a reader lacking a background in basic neuroanatomy and some exposure to allometry will be swamped in short order and the generally excellent bibliographic references make the book a current point of departure for the serious student just getting into the field. Expand
Evolution and ontogeny of neural circuits
TLDR
These findings suggest that in many neuronal systems axons do not invade unknown territories during evolutionary or ontogenetic development but follow in their ancestors' paths to their ancestral targets; if the connection is later lost, it reflects the specialization of the circuitry. Expand
AN EXAMPLE OF PARALLELISM IN CARNIVORE BRAIN EVOLUTION
  • L. Radinsky
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1971
A survey of the external brain morphology of fossil Carnivora revealed that the cruciate sulcus, a major landmark of the cerebral cortex which is present in all living carnivoran families, did notExpand
The evolution of the dorsal thalamus of jawed vertebrates, including mammals: Cladistic analysis and a new hypothesis
  • A. Butler
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Brain Research Reviews
  • 1994
TLDR
The new hypothesis holds that the dorsal thalamus comprises two basic divisions--the collothalamus and the lemnothalamus--that receive their predominant input from the midbrain roof and (plesiomorphically) from lemniscal pathways, including the optic tract, respectively. Expand
Embryology and the Modern Synthesis in Evolutionary Theory
Did embryology and, more specifically, experimental embryology assist in the creation of the modern synthesis during the thirties and early forties, or, on the contrary, was it a retarding element?Expand
Chordate evolution and the origin of craniates: An old brain in a new head
  • A. Butler
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Anatomical record
  • 2000
TLDR
It is suggested here that the transition to the craniate brain from a cephalochordate‐like ancestral form may have involved a mediolateral shift in expression of the genes that specify nervous system development from various parts of the ectoderm. Expand
Evolution of the telencephalon in nonmammals.
  • R. Northcutt
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Annual review of neuroscience
  • 1981
TLDR
The relatively sophisticated armamentarium of neurobiological tech­ niques available today allows us to establish more accurately the anatomy of the telencephalon; these data, data from the fossil record, and a more sophisticated view of vertebrate phylogeny allow us to propose and test new hypotheses regarding the evolution of the vertebrate telencesphalon. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...