Changing toddlers' and preschoolers' attachment classifications: the Circle of Security intervention.

@article{Hoffman2006ChangingTA,
  title={Changing toddlers' and preschoolers' attachment classifications: the Circle of Security intervention.},
  author={Kent T Hoffman and Robert S. Marvin and Glen Cooper and Bert Powell},
  journal={Journal of consulting and clinical psychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={74 6},
  pages={
          1017-26
        }
}
The Circle of Security intervention uses a group treatment modality to provide parent education and psychotherapy that is based on attachment theory. The purpose of this study was to track changes in children's attachment classifications pre- and immediately postintervention. Participants were 65 toddler- or preschooler- caregiver dyads recruited from Head Start and Early Head Start programs. As predicted, there were significant within-subject changes from disorganized to organized attachment… Expand
The Circle of Security Intervention: Building Early Attachment Security
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The intensive Circle of Security intervention is an attachment-based program that utilises video feedback to support parents to understand and respond to their children’s attachment needs. TheExpand
EFFICACY OF THE 20-WEEK CIRCLE OF SECURITY INTERVENTION: CHANGES IN CAREGIVER REFLECTIVE FUNCTIONING, REPRESENTATIONS, AND CHILD ATTACHMENT IN AN AUSTRALIAN CLINICAL SAMPLE.
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Evidence adding to the evidence suggesting that the 20-week Circle of Security intervention results in significant relationship improvements for caregivers and their children is added. Expand
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A randomized controlled trial comparing Circle of Security Intervention and treatment as usual as interventions to increase attachment security in infants of mentally ill mothers: Study Protocol
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This randomized controlled clinical trial tests whether promoting attachment security in infancy with the Circle of Security (COS) Intervention will result in a higher rate of securely attached children compared to treatment as usual (TAU), and whether the distributions of securely connected children are moderated or mediated by variations in maternal sensitivity, mentalizing, attachment representations, and psychopathology obtained at baseline and at follow-up. Expand
'Right from the Start': randomized trial comparing an attachment group intervention to supportive home visiting.
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RFTS is as effective as home visiting in improving infant attachment security and maternal sensitivity, and was not significantly different in terms of participation ratings, client satisfaction, or follow-up service requests. Expand
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Attachment theory is at heart a theory of intimacy. The developmental accomplishment of attachment security depends on a relational context of deep understanding and love between the growing childExpand
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