Changing concepts of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population.

@article{Manton1982ChangingCO,
  title={Changing concepts of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population.},
  author={K. Manton},
  journal={The Milbank Memorial Fund quarterly. Health and society},
  year={1982},
  volume={60 2},
  pages={
          183-244
        }
}
  • K. Manton
  • Published 1982
  • Medicine
  • The Milbank Memorial Fund quarterly. Health and society
A review of current theories concerning human mortality is first presented and their consistency with current evidence on mortality is considered. The author then presents some alternative perspectives on human mortality and longevity and discusses short- and long-term implications of various models of mortality. The need for systematic mortality research with a multidisciplinary perspective in order to understand current mortality conditions and to anticipate future mortality trends is… Expand

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