Changes in the Velocity Structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

@article{Rignot2006ChangesIT,
  title={Changes in the Velocity Structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet},
  author={E. Rignot and Pannirselvam Kanagaratnam},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={311},
  pages={986 - 990}
}
Using satellite radar interferometry observations of Greenland, we detected widespread glacier acceleration below 66° north between 1996 and 2000, which rapidly expanded to 70° north in 2005. Accelerated ice discharge in the west and particularly in the east doubled the ice sheet mass deficit in the last decade from 90 to 220 cubic kilometers per year. As more glaciers accelerate farther north, the contribution of Greenland to sea-level rise will continue to increase. 

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