Changes in memory processing with age

@article{Grady2000ChangesIM,
  title={Changes in memory processing with age},
  author={Cheryl L. Grady and Fergus I. M. Craik},
  journal={Current Opinion in Neurobiology},
  year={2000},
  volume={10},
  pages={224-231}
}
  • C. Grady, F. Craik
  • Published 2000
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Neurobiology
Over the years, a large body of literature has shown that humans display losses in memory with age, but that not all types of memory are affected equally. Similarly, recent evidence from functional neuroimaging experiments has revealed that, depending on the task, older adults can display greater or lesser activity in task-relevant brain areas compared with younger adults. Recent behavioral and neurophysiological experiments are furthering our understanding of the effects of aging on cognition… Expand

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper

Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Aging
Aging is characterized by changes in memory and other domains of cognitive function. Using functional neuroimaging techniques, we can go beyond behavioral measures and investigate what is happeningExpand
New visions of the aging mind and brain
TLDR
Older adults show prominent changes in the recruitment of prefrontal regions, and a conspicuous increase in the extent to which activation patterns are bilateral in the domains of working memory and episodic memory. Expand
Age effects on the neural correlates of episodic retrieval: increased cortical recruitment with matched performance.
TLDR
In older adults, retrieval-related increases in activity were more widespread and of greater magnitude than in the young, which suggests an age-related decline in the efficiency with which neural populations support cognitive function. Expand
Age effects on the neural correlates of successful memory encoding.
TLDR
The data indicate that older subjects engage much of the same neural circuitry as younger subjects when encoding new memories, however, the findings also point to age-related differences in both prefrontal and temporal activity during successful episodic encoding. Expand
Functional neuroimaging of memory: Implications for cognitive aging
TLDR
Several methodological issues, such as defining the relation between brain structure and function, and determining the relationship between performance and activation, are particularly important for understanding age‐related changes. Expand
Neurocognitive Aging and the Compensation Hypothesis
The most unexpected and intriguing result from functional brain imaging studies of cognitive aging is evidence for age-related overactivation: greater activation in older adults than in youngerExpand
Aging and Memory in Humans
Memory involves the recall or recognition of information encoded in the recent or distant past. Even in the absence of age-related neurodegenerative conditions, such as dementia, there is significantExpand
Aging and Remote Memory Declines: Preliminary Findings
Abstract Relatively little research has examined the effect of aging upon remote memory, especially among individuals who have entered their 10th decade of life. The present study examined whetherExpand
Relationship between Hippocampal Structure and Memory Function in Elderly Humans
TLDR
It is shown that hippocampal volume loss in healthy older persons correlates with gray matter loss of the entire limbic system and shows no correlation with an electrophysiological (event-related potential [ERP]) index of recollection. Expand
Successful physiological aging and episodic memory: A brain stimulation study
TLDR
The present data confirm that older adults with higher memory performance show less prefrontal asymmetry as an efficient strategy to counteract age-related memory decline. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 74 REFERENCES
Recruitment of unique neural systems to support visual memory in normal aging
TLDR
Psychophysical measurements of visual short-term memory with positron emission tomography in young and old individuals and found that old participants recruited unique areas, including medial temporal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, which may have acted to compensate for reduced interactions between the other brain areas. Expand
The processing-speed theory of adult age differences in cognition.
TLDR
A theory is proposed that increased age in adulthood is associated with a decrease in the speed with which many processing operations can be executed and that this reduction in speed leads to impairments in cognitive functioning because of what are termed the limited time mechanism and the simultaneity mechanism. Expand
Individual and developmental differences in working memory across the life span
TLDR
The results suggest that different mechanisms underlie developmental and individual differences in susceptibility to interference across the life span, and a model is proposed in which memory span and processing speed both increase with development but are relatively independent abilities within age groups. Expand
Age Differences in the Frontal Lateralization of Verbal and Spatial Working Memory Revealed by PET
TLDR
Positron emission tomography was used to investigate verbal and spatial short-term storage in older and younger adults to consider several mechanisms that could account for these age differences including the possibility that bilateral activation reflects recruitment to compensate for neural decline. Expand
Age Differences in Behavior and PET Activation Reveal Differences in Interference Resolution in Verbal Working Memory
TLDR
It is demonstrated that older adults show more behavioral interference than younger subjects on this task, and they also show no reliable activation at the same lateral prefrontal site, which leads to the conclusion that this prefrontal site is functionally involved in mediating resolution among conflicting responses or among conflicting representations in working memory. Expand
Adult age differences in the functional neuroanatomy of verbal recognition memory
TLDR
Regression analyses predicting reaction time in the memory task from regional PET counts confirmed that the neural system mediating memory retrieval is more widely distributed for older adults than for young adults. Expand
Age-related reductions in human recognition memory due to impaired encoding.
TLDR
Age-related impairments of memory may be due to a failure to encode the stimuli adequately, which is reflected in the lack of cortical and hippocampal activation during encoding. Expand
False memories and aging
TLDR
Evidence indicating that cognitive aging is often associated with increased susceptibility to various kinds of false recollections is reviewed, and neuroimaging studies suggest that age-related changes in medial temporal and frontal regions may play a role in the altered functioning of specific encoding and retrieval processes that give rise to memory distortions. Expand
The Effects of Divided Attention on Encoding- and Retrieval-Related Brain Activity: A PET Study of Younger and Older Adults
TLDR
Left inferior prefrontal activity was reduced similarly by aging and by DA during encoding, suggesting that the behavioral correspondence between these effects is the result of a reduced ability to engage in elaborate encoding operations. Expand
Imaging Cognition: An Empirical Review of PET Studies with Normal Subjects
TLDR
PET studies of higher-order cognitive processes, including attention (sustained and selective), perception (of objects, faces, and locations), language (word listening, reading, and production), working memory (phonological and visuo-spatial), semantic memory retrieval, episodic memory retrieval (verbal and nonverbal), priming, and procedural memory are reviewed. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...