Changes in light scattering that accompany the action potential in squid giant axons: potential‐dependent components

@article{Cohen1972ChangesIL,
  title={Changes in light scattering that accompany the action potential in squid giant axons: potential‐dependent components},
  author={Lawrence B. Cohen and Richard Darwin Keynes and David Landowne},
  journal={The Journal of Physiology},
  year={1972},
  volume={224}
}
1. To obtain information about structural events that occur in axons, changes in light scattering from squid giant axons were measured during action potentials and voltage‐clamp steps. 
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When light scattering was measured during hyperpolarizing and depolarizing voltage‐clamp steps, relatively large scattering changes were found to depend on the time integral of the ionic current and not on the changes in conductance or potential.
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Experimental evidence for the detection of changes in intrinsic optical properties, i.e., changes in optical refractive index, that covary with changes in the transmembrane voltage are reviewed.
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    The Japanese journal of physiology
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TLDR
Nerve fibers produce several non-electrical signals on excitation, and recent findings are discussed in the hope that some of them might give us clues to molecular events underlying the excitation process.
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Changes in axon light scattering that accompany the action potential: current‐dependent components
TLDR
When light scattering was measured during hyperpolarizing and depolarizing voltage‐clamp steps, relatively large scattering changes were found to depend on the time integral of the ionic current and not on the changes in conductance or potential.
Analysis of the potential‐dependent changes in optical retardation in the squid giant axon
1. An analysis has been made of the change in optical retradation of the membrane elicited by the application of voltage—clamp pulses in squid giant axons.
Changes in light scattering associated with the action potential in crab nerves
1. Changes in light scattering from stimulated crab leg nerves were measured in an effort to study changes in structure that occur during the action potential.
Light Scattering and Birefringence Changes during Nerve Activity
Two optical techniques—light scattering and birefringence—have been used to detect rapid structural changes accompanying the action potentials in two types of non-myelinated nerve fibre. Changes in
Light scattering and birefringence changes during activity in the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus
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The size and time course of the changes in light scattering and in bire‐fringence that occur during and after the discharge of the electric organ are determined.
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The importance of ionic movements in excitable tissues has been emphasized by a number of recent experiments which are consistent with the theory that nervous conduction depends on a specific increase in permeability which allows sodium ions to move from the more concentrated solution outside a nerve fibre to the more dilute solution inside it.
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Reducing the concentrations of calcium and magnesium made the giant axon of Loligo spontaneously active and formed long trains of impulses in response to a single shock.
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This article concludes a series of papers concerned with the flow of electric current through the surface membrane of a giant nerve fibre by putting them into mathematical form and showing that they will account for conduction and excitation in quantitative terms.
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Support for this view has been provided by showing that the single large fibre of the cuttlefish does actually undergo a change in diameter when it is stimulated, and the evidence pointing in this direction is set out here.
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