Changes in familiarity and recollection across the lifespan: An ERP perspective

@article{Friedman2010ChangesIF,
  title={Changes in familiarity and recollection across the lifespan: An ERP perspective},
  author={D. Friedman and M. Chastelaine and D. Nessler and Brenda R. Malcolm},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={2010},
  volume={1310},
  pages={124-141}
}
The ability to recognize previous experience depends on two neurocognitive processes, familiarity, fast-acting and relatively automatic, and recollection, slower-acting and more effortful. Familiarity appears to mature relatively early in development and is maintained with aging, whereas recollection shows protracted development and deteriorates with aging. To assess this model, ERP and behavioral data were recorded in children (9-10 years), adolescents (13-14), young (20-30) and older (65-85… Expand
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  • D. Friedman
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Front. Behav. Neurosci.
  • 2013
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TLDR
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