Changes in close relationships between cancer patients and their partners.

@article{Drabe2013ChangesIC,
  title={Changes in close relationships between cancer patients and their partners.},
  author={Natalie Drabe and Lutz Wittmann and Diana Zwahlen and Stefan B{\"u}chi and Josef Jenewein},
  journal={Psycho-oncology},
  year={2013},
  volume={22 6},
  pages={
          1344-52
        }
}
  • Natalie Drabe, Lutz Wittmann, +2 authors Josef Jenewein
  • Published in Psycho-oncology 2013
  • Medicine
  • PURPOSE Distress caused by cancer may have an important impact on the quality of a couple's relationship. This investigation examined perceived relationship changes in a sample of cancer patients and their partners, accounting for gender and role (i.e., patient or partner). PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 209 patients with different cancer types and stages and their partners completed questionnaires with items on psychological distress (anxiety and depression), quality of life, and… CONTINUE READING

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