Changes in brain activation associated with reward processing in smokers and nonsmokers

@article{MartinSlch2001ChangesIB,
  title={Changes in brain activation associated with reward processing in smokers and nonsmokers},
  author={Chantal Martin-S{\"o}lch and S Magyar and Gabriella K{\"u}nig and John H. Missimer and Wolfram Schultz and Klaus Leonard Leenders},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={139},
  pages={278-286}
}
Abstract. Tobacco smoking is the most frequent form of substance abuse. Several studies have shown that the addictive action of nicotine is mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. This system is implicated in reward processing. In order to better understand the relationship between nicotine addiction and reward in humans, we investigated differences between smokers and nonsmokers in the activation of brain regions involved in processing reward information. Using [H215O] positron emission… 
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