Changes in Agriculture and Abundance of Snow Geese Affect Carrying Capacity of Sandhill Cranes in Nebraska

@inproceedings{Pearse2010ChangesIA,
  title={Changes in Agriculture and Abundance of Snow Geese Affect Carrying Capacity of Sandhill Cranes in Nebraska},
  author={Aaron T. Pearse and Gary L. Krapu and David A. Brandt and Paul J. Kinzel},
  year={2010}
}
Abstract The central Platte River valley (CPRV) in Nebraska, USA, is a key spring-staging area for approximately 80% of the midcontinent population of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; hereafter cranes). Evidence that staging cranes acquired less lipid reserves during the 1990s compared to the late 1970s and increases in use of the CPRV by snow geese (Chen caerulescens) prompted us to investigate availability of waste corn and quantify spatial and temporal patterns of crane and waterfowl use of… 
Habitat Use and Abundance Patterns of Sandhill Cranes in the Central Platte River Valley, Nebraska, 2003–2010
The Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) in Nebraska is an important spring stopover area for the midcontinent population of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis). Alterations to crop rotation and loss of
Location and Agricultural Practices Influence Spring use of Harvested Cornfields by Cranes and Geese in Nebraska
ABSTRACT Millions of ducks, geese, and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis; hereafter cranes) stop in the Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) of Nebraska to store nutrients for migration and
Timing of spring surveys for midcontinent sandhill cranes
TLDR
Index values used to monitor midcontinent sandhill crane abundance vary annually, in part, due to annual variation in migration chronology and to spatial distribution of cranes in the Platte River Valley; therefore, managers should interpret survey results cautiously, with awareness of a continuing need to identify and understand components of variation.
Status and Harvests of Sandhill Cranes: Mid- continent, Rocky Mountain, Lower Colorado River Valley and Eastern Populations
Compared to increases recorded in the 1970s, annual indices to abundance of the Mid-Continent Population (MCP) of sandhill cranes have been relatively stable since the early 1980s. The spring 2012
Temporospatial Shifts in Sandhill Crane Staging in the Central Platte River Valley in Response to Climatic variation and Habitat Change
Over 80% of the Mid-Continent Sandhill Crane (Antigone canadensis) Population (MCP), estimated at over 660,000 individuals, stops in the Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) during spring migration
Comparative Spring-Staging Ecology of Sympatric Arctic-Nesting Geese in South-Central Nebraska
Abstract The Rainwater Basin in Nebraska has been a historic staging area for midcontinent greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis) since the 1950s and, in the mid-1990s, millions of
Agricultural Practices and Residual Corn During Spring Crane and Waterfowl Migration in Nebraska
TLDR
Nebraska's Central Platte River Valley (CPRV) is a major spring-staging area for migratory birds, and data show that post-harvest management of cornfields also can substantially influence the density of residual corn remaining in fields during spring migration.
Spring snow goose hunting influences body composition of waterfowl staging in Nebraska
A spring hunt was instituted in North America to reduce abundance of snow geese (Chen caerulescens) by increasing mortality of adults directly, yet disturbance from hunting activities can indirectly
Spring migration ecology of the mid-continent sandhill crane population with an emphasis on use of the Central Platte River Valley, Nebraska
TLDR
The results suggest that as habitats of limited or no value to cranes increase on the landscape, more flight time and higher maintenance costs may reduce fat storage, as well as maintaining productive habitats on the wintering grounds to condition cranes for migration and reproduction.
Overwintering Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) in Nebraska, USA
TLDR
Analysis of historical observations indicates such large numbers of Sandhill Cranes have not been documented previously during winter in Nebraska, with the exception of 5,000 cranes near Grand Island, Nebraska, on 15 December 1990 that were not reported again following an arctic blast 2–3 days after the sighting.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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